Landtec Surveying Services

Clearly you are interested in getting a survey of a parcel of land but you may not know exactly what to ask for. However, you most certainly know why you need a survey.

Fortunately, this page is designed to easily guide you through your choices based upon your needs.

There are only 10 types of surveys recognized by Florida law and Landtec can perform all types. However, the clear majority of surveys ordered by customers are typically Boundary Surveys even though these boundary surveys may contain elements of other types of surveys as well.

Please review the following section regarding survey standards and then simply browse the types of surveys based upon the purpose of the survey.

Surveys using Florida Standards are what almost all customers will need.
All land surveying in Florida is required to meet minimum technical standards as set forth by the State.
Each state governs their own standards and Florida’s are some of the most stringent in the country. Whether for a purchase or for construction, these are the standards a customer should request.

Surveys using ALTA Standards are almost entirely reserved for commercial real estate purchase transactions.
There are some surveys that may need to comply with a nationally recognized set of standards known as ALTA/NSPS standards (American Land Title Association/National Society of Professional Surveyors).

These are used as a more stringent set of standards and predominantly as to include a full title policy review ensuring that all matters as illustrated by Schedule B-II of the title policy are reflected on the survey.

Compliance with ALTA standards also involve more time in the field as additional field measurement redundancies are required and additional optional field locations of certain improvements must be made as would be outlined on the “Table A” requirements as dictated by the customer.

Browse the different types of surveys below:

Boundary Surveys
FEMA Elevation Certificates
ALTA Surveys
Condominium Surveys

A common term used in the Real Estate Industry is a Mortgage Survey but If you read the link on types of surveys, you would have seen that there is no such thing here in Florida. What you will need is a Boundary Survey. If you are purchasing property (or possibly when just Refinancing), your lender will typically require this and it may be ordered on your behalf by your Title Company or possibly your Realtor.

A Boundary Survey It is meant to prove that the legal description for the parcel is accurate and that there are no gaps or overlaps with adjoiner parcels. Boundary surveys will also identify all improvements on the property and whether there are any physical encumbrances such as encroachments into easements.

Condominium surveys are specialized forms of Boundary surveys due to condominium limits usually being described by the actual physical elements comprising the unit both horizontally and vertically. These elements are fully described in the condominium’s Declaration of Covenants. Lenders will rarely require surveys for condominiums.

Some survey companies will falsely state that a “mortgage survey” or “mortgage inspection” is available to you but it is not. By Statute, a land surveyor may not provide a “lesser” survey by not setting property corners or circumventing Florida’s minimum technical standards of a Boundary survey just because its purpose is for a mortgage transaction.

When an order is placed for a Boundary Survey, we automatically research the flood zone of the parcel prior to going into the field. If the subject property is for a purchase and is being financed, we will add the fee for a FEMA Elevation Certificate to the survey fee as a lender will require flood insurance protection. There is a built-in discount when these services are provided together.

If the survey is for a commercial property, ALTA standards may be required for the Boundary survey. If so, we will need the Table A checklist of the ALTA requirements submitted with your order.

Landtec Surveying will confirm all details with you regarding the scope of services prior to proceeding with any work and all orders placed online are initially treated as quote requests. Customers will receive a Fee Estimate requiring approval prior to us proceeding with any work.

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FEMA Elevation Certificates
Topographic Surveys

If your property falls within a Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA) as delineated on FEMA Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM’s), it is recommended that you obtain flood insurance. If your home is financed, your lender will require it. We can provide FEMA Elevation Certificates that denote all the required vertical data that insurance agents will use to determine flood insurance premiums.

When an order is placed for a Boundary Survey, we automatically research the flood zone of the parcel prior to going into the field. If the subject property is being purchased and is financed, we will add the fee of an elevation certificate to the survey fee. There is a built-in discount when these services are provided together.

Additionally, if you are trying to remove your property from a Special Flood Hazard Area, we can provide Topographic surveys or other topographic work necessary if you are interested in obtaining a Letter of Map Revision (LOMR) or Letter of Map Amendment (LOMA).

Landtec Surveying will confirm all details with you regarding the scope of services prior to proceeding with any work and all orders placed online are initially treated as quote requests. Customers will receive a Fee Estimate requiring approval prior to us proceeding with any work.

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Boundary Surveys
FEMA Elevation Certificates
As-Built Surveys
Construction Layout Surveys
Topographic Surveys

Landtec also provides required surveying services for Platting and Residential & Commercial Site Development

When developing a new site, there will be a succession of required services involved. Whether the site is already vacant or there is planned demolition involved, you will first need a Boundary Survey. Aside from existing improvements, this initial survey will likely require additional information such as more comprehensive utility locations (including underground), topographic data, tree locations or possibly locating elements of adjoiner improvements.

During the initial permitting stage, with the aid of your surveys and site plans, the building department will be verifying that planned construction will comply with local zoning codes, proper building setback and greenspace requirements, and drainage capabilities.

As construction commences, your contractor will require Construction Layout Surveys or “stakeouts” of proposed improvements although some contractors choose to perform minor layout services themselves if allowed by law.

Additionally, the building department will require periodic As-Built Surveys to ensure that construction is adhering to planned horizontal and vertical positions. Site grading may require a Topographic Survey to obtain current ground elevations or stakeout proposed vertical positions. A final Boundary survey and FEMA Elevation certificate would be required at the end of construction in order to receive a Certificate of Occupancy.

Landtec Surveying will confirm all details with you regarding the scope of services prior to proceeding with any work and all orders placed online are initially treated as quote requests. Customers will receive a Fee Estimate requiring approval prior to us proceeding with any work.

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Boundary Surveys
Topographic Surveys
Construction Layout Surveys
As-Built Surveys

As with new construction, and prior to issuing a permit, your local building department will need to examine your planned improvements – especially regarding their relationship to the property boundaries. You will minimally need a Boundary Survey to get things rolling.

Depending on the type of construction, your contractor may be able to stake out the positions of planned improvements or they may require us to perform a Construction Layout Survey. For instance if you were constructing a rectangular pool parallel with the home, your contractor would likely feel comfortable staking out its position himself whereas if it were a freestanding curvilenear pool, he may want us to stake it out.

Topographic Surveys may be required for changes to drainage systems, parking areas or other grading changes.

Depending on the scope of work, the building department may require an As-Built Survey once construction or a particular phase of construction is complete to confirm that all improvements were constructed in accordance with your plans.

 

Landtec Surveying will confirm all details with you regarding the scope of services prior to proceeding with any work and all orders placed online are initially treated as quote requests. Customers will receive a Fee Estimate requiring approval prior to us proceeding with any work.

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Boundary Surveys
Specific Purpose Surveys

From simple field mistakes to errors in legal descriptions, there are a great many reasons that can lead to errors in property line locations. Unfortunately, this can lead to incorrect locations of a property’s improvements relative to the required setbacks, arguments with neighbors, and matters requiring legal action to correct.

A Boundary Survey will be required. Land Surveyors cannot identify “ownership” of property but we can isolate matters of survey law and report these findings to the proper authority. A “correct survey” should be the goal for any Land Surveyor and a correct survey is defined as one that is accepted as correct by the courts after having applied proper surveying methodology and case law.

Landtec Surveying is known for its expertise in boundary law. We are proud to say that every time we have identified a boundary error in the field or gone head to head with another land surveyor disputing our conclusions, we have been found to have the correct determinations.

Sometimes a full boundary survey isn’t quite necessary or simply isn’t adequate to fully represent the matters at hand… it may be appropriate to use a Specific Purpose Survey to identify disputed issues.

Landtec Surveying will confirm all details with you regarding the scope of services prior to proceeding with any work and all orders placed online are initially treated as quote requests. Customers will receive a Fee Estimate requiring approval prior to us proceeding with any work.

VIEW RATES ORDER YOUR SURVEY NOW

Topographic Surveys
Special Purpose Surveys

A Topographic Survey is required specifically whenever vertical data is needed. Maybe there is a needed change to correct drainage problems, or maybe a property is being completely redeveloped. Developing a project site plan may very well include changes to the property’s grading. Design professionals will need to know existing grades to determine how much dirt will be needed to either be added to raise the existing grade elevations or excavated and hauled away in order to lower elevations of the grade. For much larger projects, this could also form the basis of a Quantity Survey used to calculate the volume of fill.

Occasionally a Special Purpose Survey may be used to delineate minor vertical data within a limited area.

Landtec Surveying will confirm all details with you regarding the scope of services prior to proceeding with any work and all orders placed online are initially treated as quote requests. Customers will receive a Fee Estimate requiring approval prior to us proceeding with any work.

VIEW RATES ORDER YOUR SURVEY NOW

Hydrographic Surveys
Mean High Water Surveys
Special Purpose Surveys

A Hydrographic Survey would be required specifically when dealing with bodies of water including underwater elevations. Other aspects of the water body such as water current or tide stages may be included depending on the scope of services required. A Hydrographic survey along with a Mean High Water Survey would likely be required if canal or river dredging activities are being contemplated or if you are planning to construct a dock or seawall.

Mean High Water Surveys are required whenever a water boundary delineation is needed. Although a boundary in surveying refers to a horizontal position, a mean high water line’s horizontal location is defined by a particular vertical height of tidal water and its relationship to a waterway’s slope. Mean High Water surveys depict the boundary between upland private ownership and submerged Sovereign lands.

Special Purpose Surveys are a category of survey type that is reserved for any purposes that would not be served by any one of the other specific types of surveys mentioned and may be best suited for certain types of water related purposes.

Landtec Surveying will confirm all details with you regarding the scope of services prior to proceeding with any work and all orders placed online are initially treated as quote requests. Customers will receive a Fee Estimate requiring approval prior to us proceeding with any work.

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Special Purpose Surveys

Local municipalities require these surveys to obtain certain licenses. They are also known as Radius Surveys or Distance Surveys. There is no specific State category for this type of survey which is why they are treated as Special Purpose Surveys.

They depict distances from the proposed license site to establishments such as churches, houses of worship and religious centers, schools, and other like licensed establishments. The category of establishments, as well as the required distance parameters to the establishments, are dictated by the local municipalities requiring the survey

Landtec Surveying will confirm all details with you regarding the scope of services prior to proceeding with any work and all orders placed online are initially treated as quote requests. Customers will receive a Fee Estimate requiring approval prior to us proceeding with any work.

VIEW RATES ORDER YOUR SURVEY NOW

Special Purpose Surveys

Special Purpose Surveys are a category of survey type that is reserved for any purposes that would not be served by any one of the other specific types of surveys mentioned.

A Land Surveyor is charged with measuring “the earth” and any items associated with it. For instance, unusual circumstances may dictate that you only need a portion of a piece of property measured. If so, and say, an As-Built Survey would not be a fitting type of survey, then a Special Purpose Survey may be the type of survey you need.

We have performed surveys for many different purposes throughout the years. They include:

  • Accident scene investigations
  • Wetland delineations
  • Liquor license permits
  • Communication tower locations relative to airport runways
  • Large scale event planning
  • Monitor well locations
  • Seawall and dock permits
  • Canal cross-sections
  • Community redevelopment programs
  • Parking lot renovations
  • Utility and infrastructure planning
  • Mortgage fraud investigations
  • Traffic analysis
  • Land planning proposal disputes
  • Litigation including expert witness testimony
  • …and more

While some of these purposes defined the use of one of the other listed types of surveys, others required the use of Special Purpose surveys.

Landtec Surveying will confirm all details with you regarding the scope of services prior to proceeding with any work and all orders placed online are initially treated as quote requests. Customers will receive a Fee Estimate requiring approval prior to us proceeding with any work.

VIEW RATES ORDER YOUR SURVEY NOW

Have Questions? Call Us: 866-776-3185

What is a Mortgage Survey?

Simply stated, a Mortgage Survey is needed when purchasing or refinancing real estate.

However, although the term is widely used here in Florida, there is no such thing as a mortgage survey. More accurately stated, a mortgage survey - in Florida - is a Boundary Survey performed for mortgage related purposes.

Unfortunately, some survey companies here in Florida will falsely claim that a mortgage survey or mortgage inspection is available to you but it is not. Some will go as far as to imply that this will be a less costly type of survey than a Boundary Survey. This simply is not the case.

Florida Administrative Code defines the types of surveys that may be legally provided to customers by land surveyors and although many people inquire about mortgage surveys, what they are referring to are Boundary Surveys whose purpose is for that of a real estate purchase – or possibly a refinance.

Lenders and Title Agents will need this type of survey to accomplish two primary goals:

1) Prove that the legal description accurately describes the subject parcel being conveyed and that there are no gaps or overlaps of property boundaries.

2) Identify all improvements to the subject parcel to determine whether there are any encumbrances or deficiencies such as encroachments into easements or violations of building setbacks.

If there are any such deficiencies, they will minimally be included in exceptions to the title policy and shown as not being covered by the title insurance. If deficiencies are extensive, possible legal action may be required to remove the cloud that will then exist on the title. Obviously, this information is vital to the prospective buyer as they need to be well informed in such a major purchase and can then further investigate the costs of any curative actions prior to closing.

This is why a buyer, whether or not there is a lender requirement to do so, should always consider a boundary survey whenever purchasing property. It is simply sound due diligence.

Further, Florida Administrative Code also prohibits a land surveyor from providing a lesser survey or circumventing Florida’s minimum technical standards by simply changing the type of survey if that particular type of survey does not suit the purposes of the survey request.

For example, at first glance in reading about the types of surveys, an As-Built Survey may serve the purpose of a real estate transaction. However, upon reading more into the Florida’s minimum technical standards, one will see that this type of survey is mainly reserved to confirm compliance with construction plans. Property corner monumentation does not have to be identified or set when conducting As-Built Surveys. This does not serve the two goals mentioned above regarding Boundary Surveys for purposes of a real estate transaction.

Types of Surveys

The following is an excerpt from the FLORIDA ADMINISTRATIVE CODE – Chapter 5J-17.050

(10) Survey: the orderly process of determining facts of size, shape, identity, geodetic location, or legal location by viewing and applying direct measurement of features on or near the earth’s surface using field or image methods; defined as follows according to the type of data obtained, the methods used, and the purpose(s) to be served:

(a) As-Built Survey: a survey performed to obtain horizontal and/or vertical dimensional data so that constructed improvements may be located and delineated; also known as a Record Survey.

(b) Boundary Survey: a survey, the primary purpose of which is to document the perimeters, or any one of them, of a parcel or tract of land by establishing or re-establishing corners, monuments, and boundary lines for the purposes of describing the parcel, locating fixed improvements on the parcel, dividing the parcel, or platting.

(c) Condominium Survey: a survey performed pursuant to Chapter 718, F.S.; includes a Boundary Survey.

(d) Construction Layout Survey: the measurements made, prior to or while construction is in progress, to control elevation, configuration, and horizontal position and dimensions.

(e) Control Survey: a survey which provides horizontal or vertical position data for the support or control of subordinate surveys or for mapping.

(f) Hydrographic Survey: a survey having as its principal purpose the determination of data relating to bodies of water, and which may consist of the determination of one or several of the following classes of data: depth of water and configuration of bottom; directions and force of current; heights and times of water stages; and location of fixed objects for survey and navigation purposes.

(g) Mean High Water Line Survey: a survey to document the mean high water line as defined in Chapter 177, Part II, F.S.

(h) Quantity Survey: a survey to obtain measurements of quantity.

(i) Record Survey: a survey performed to obtain horizontal and/or vertical dimensional data so that constructed improvements may be located and delineated; also known as an As-Built Survey.

(j) Specific or Special Purpose Survey: a survey performed for a purpose other than the purposes detailed in paragraphs (10)(a)-(i) or (k) of this rule.

(k) Topographic Survey: a survey of selected natural and artificial features of a part of the earth’s surface to determine horizontal and vertical spatial relations.

Additionally, per an excerpt from Chaper 5J-17.051 regarding Standards of Practice

(3)(b):

1. Each survey map and report shall state the type of survey it depicts consistent with the types of surveys defined in paragraphs 5J-17.050(10)(a)-(k), F.A.C. The purpose of a survey, as set out in paragraphs 5J-17.050(10)(a)-(k), F.A.C., dictates the type of survey to be performed and depicted, and a licensee may not avoid the minimum standards required by rule of a particular survey type merely by changing the name of the survey type to conform with what standards or lack of them the licensee chooses to follow.

Surveys using ALTA Standards are almost entirely reserved for commercial real estate purchase transactions.

There are some surveys that may need to comply with a nationally recognized set of standards known as ALTA/NSPS standards (American Land Title Association/National Society of Professional Surveyors).

These are used as a more stringent set of standards and predominantly as to include a full title policy review ensuring that all matters as illustrated by Schedule B-II of the title policy are reflected on the survey.

Compliance with ALTA standards also involve more time in the field as additional field measurement redundancies are required and additional optional field locations of certain improvements must be made as would be outlined on the “Table A” requirements as dictated by the customer.

FEMA Elevation Certificates

FEMA Elevation Certificates are administrative forms supplied by the Federal Emergency Managements Agency’s

National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

Based on Flood Insurance Studies (FIS), FEMA issues Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM’s) that delineate potential Special Flood Hazard Areas (SFHA’s) covering participating communities throughout the United States.

Potential flooding values related to these SFHA’s (flood hazard zones) as shown on the FIRM’s, together with observed relevant vertical data as measured by our survey field crews, are reported on the FEMA Elevation Certificate.

These forms are used to provide elevation information necessary to ensure:

Determination of proper flood insurance premium rates,

Supporting requests for a Letter of Map Amendment (LOMA),

Supporting requests for a Letter of Map Amendment based on fill (LOMR-F), or

Compliance with community floodplain management ordinances

Minimum Technical Standards

FLORIDA ADMINISTRATIVE CODE – Chapter 5J-17.052 Standards of Practice:

(1) As-Built/Record Survey:

(a) When performing as-built or record surveys, the surveyor and mapper shall obtain field measurements of vertical or horizontal dimensions of constructed improvements so that the constructed facility can be delineated in such a way that the location of the construction may be compared with the construction plans.

(b) When the surveyor and mapper prepare as-built maps they will clearly show by symbols, notations, or delineations, those constructed improvements located by the survey.

(c) All maps prepared shall meet applicable Standards of Practice.

(d) The vertical and horizontal accuracy of the measurements made shall be such that it may be determined whether the improvements were constructed consistent with planned locations.

(2) Boundary Survey, Map, and Report:

(a) Boundaries of Real Property:

1. The surveyor and mapper shall make a determination of the position of the boundary of real property in complete accord with the real property description shown on or attached to the survey map or report.

2. All boundary surveys shall result in a map.

3. Any discrepancies between the survey map and the real property description must be shown.

4. All changes in direction, including curves, shall be shown on the survey map by angles, bearings or azimuths, and will be in the same form as the description or other recorded document referenced on the map.

5. Curved lines with circular curves shall show the radii, arc distances and central angles, or radii, arc distances, chord distances and chord bearings.

6. When intersecting lines are non-radial to a curve, sufficient angular data shall be shown to relate the line to the curve.

7. Surveys of all or part of a lot(s) which is part of a recorded subdivision shall show the following upon the map:

a. The lot(s) and block numbers or other designations, including those of adjoining lots.

b. A comparison between recorded directions and distances with field measured directions and distances when they vary.

c. A comparison between the recorded directions and distances with field measured directions and distances to the nearest street intersection, right of way intersection or other identifiable reference point.

d. The dimensioned remaining portion of a lot(s) when part of a lot is included within the description.

8. Surveys of parcels described by metes and bounds shall show the following upon the map:

a. The relationship of the parcel(s) to at least one established identifiable real property corner;

b. All information called for in the property description, such as point of commencement, course bearings and distances, and point of beginning;

c. A comparison between recorded directions and distances and field measured directions and distances on the boundary when they vary;

d. The most current abutting recorded instrument or recorded plat either known by the surveyor and mapper or furnished to the surveyor and mapper.

(b) Boundary Monuments:

1. The surveyor and mapper shall set monuments as defined herein, unless monuments already exist or cannot be set due to physical obstructions at such corners or unless a water boundary has been located in approximate position. The survey map shall clearly label all approximate water boundaries with notes and these shall be mapped in a distinctly different graphic fashion from water boundaries located to full survey accuracy.

2. Every boundary monument set shall:

a. Be composed of a durable material;

b. Have a minimal length of 18 inches;

c. Have a minimum cross-section area of material of 0.2 square inches;

d. Be identified with a durable marker or cap bearing either the Florida license number of the surveyor and mapper in responsible charge, the certificate of authorization number of the business entity; or name of the business entity;

e. Be detectable with conventional instruments for finding ferrous or magnetic objects.

f. When a corner falls in a hard surface such as asphalt or concrete, alternate monumentation may be used that is durable and identifiable.

3. All monuments, found or placed, must be described on the survey map. The corner descriptions shall state the size, material, and cap identification of the monument as well as whether the monument was found or set.

4. When a parcel has an irregular roadway as a boundary, such as a dirt road or a common law road, then a monumented meander or survey line shall be established along or near the feature.

5. For other irregular boundaries such as a river, lake, beach, marsh or stream, not identified as in subparagraph 5J-17.052(2)(a)1., F.A.C., a dimensioned meander or survey line may be used. When a meander or survey line is used, monuments shall be set at the meander or survey line’s terminus points on real property boundary lines and dimensions shall be shown between a meander or survey line and the boundary line sufficient to show the relationship between the two.

6. A boundary survey updating a previous survey made by the same surveyor and mapper or business entity, and which is performed for the purpose of locating non-completed new improvements by measurements to the property lines or related offset lines placed on the property since the previous survey, need not have the property corners reset.

7. Side ties to locate or set monuments shall be substantiated by a redundancy of measurements.

(c) Boundary Inconsistencies:

1. Potential boundary inconsistencies that the survey process did not attempt to detect shall be clearly indicated and explained on the survey map or in the report. Where evidence of inconsistency is found, the nature of the inconsistency shall be shown upon the survey map, such as:

a. Overlapping descriptions or hiatuses;

b. Excess or deficiency;

c. Conflicting boundary lines or monuments; or

d. Doubt as to the location on the ground of survey lines or property rights.

2. Open and notorious evidence of boundary lines, such as fences, walls, buildings, monuments or otherwise, shall be shown upon the map, together with dimensions sufficient to show their relationship to the boundary line(s).

3. All apparent physical use onto or from adjoining property must be indicated, with the extent of such use shown or noted upon the map.

4. In all cases where foundations may violate deed or easement lines and are beneath the surface, failure to determine their location shall be noted upon the map or report.

(d) Rights-of-Way, Easements, and Other Real Property Concerns:

1. All recorded public and private rights-of-way shown on applicable recorded plats adjoining or across the land being surveyed shall be located and shown upon the map.

2. Easements shown on applicable record plats or open and notorious evidence of easements or rights-of-way on or across the land being surveyed shall be located and shown upon the map.

3. When streets or street rights-of-way abutting the land surveyed are physically closed to travel, a note to this effect shall be shown upon the map.

4. When location of easements or rights-of-way of record, other than those on record plats, is required, this information must be furnished to the surveyor and mapper.

5. Human cemeteries and burial grounds located within the premises shall be located and shown upon the map when open and notorious, or when knowledge of their existence and location is furnished to the surveyor and mapper.

(e) Real Property Improvements:

1. Location of fixed improvements pertinent to the survey shall be graphically shown upon the map and their positions shall be dimensioned in reference to the boundaries, either directly or by offset lines.

2. When fixed improvements are not located or do not exist, a note to this effect shall be shown upon the map.

3. Building corners are acceptable as monumentation so long as use of building corners as monumentation is clearly noted on survey drawing.

4. When a boundary survey updating a previous boundary survey is made by the same surveyor or survey firm for purpose of locating non-completed new improvements, then property corners need not be reset; however, when a boundary survey is updating a previous survey made by the same surveyor or survey firm and is performed for purpose of locating completed new improvements then property corners must be recovered or reset. When a boundary survey updates a previous boundary survey made by a different surveyor or survey firm for the purpose of locating either non-completed or completed new improvements, then property corners must be recovered or reset.

(3) Construction Layout Survey:

(a) When the surveyor and mapper provides construction staking, these stakes must be based on controls established using the survey standards set out in Rules 5J-17.051 and 5J-17.052, F.A.C., of this chapter. The stakes provided should be adequate in number and position so that the physical items can be constructed from the plans as designed.

(b) Horizontal and Vertical Controls for Public and Private Construction Layout:

1. Section 472.003(3), F.S., provides an exemption from licensing for certain classes of individuals performing construction layout from boundary, horizontal and vertical controls that have been established by a licensed professional surveyor and mapper. This rule is designed to set out what constitutes horizontal and vertical controls.

a. Horizontal control monumentation for the purpose of this rule includes:

(I) Points of Curve, Points of Tangency, Points of Tangent Intersections, Points on Line and Points on Curve.

(II) Points of Intersection of other streets or roads.

(III) Angle points or changes in direction.

b. Horizontal control monumentation for road center-lines, right-of-way lines, reference lines or base lines shall be at least a minimum of two (2) points placed so that no point on the line being monumented is more than 700 feet from a control monument.

c. Horizontal control monumentation for main utility lines (such as water, sewer, storm drainage, electric, telephone, television, gas, etc.) when not constructed within or along a road right-of-way control in accordance with sub-subparagraph 5J-17.052(3)(b)1.b., F.A.C., shall be at least a minimum of two (2) points placed so that no point on the line being monumented is more than 700 feet from a control monument.

d. Horizontal control monumentation for buildings and/or primary constructions shall be at least:

(I) Boundaries, or

(II) Control or base lines (minimum of 2 points), or

(III) A minimum of a four-corner envelope for non-residential construction improvement layout.

e. Horizontal control monumentation required by plans as a control for horizontal location not included in sub-sub-subparagraphs 5J-17.052(3)(b)1.b., c., or d., F.A.C., shall meet the requirements of subparagraph 5J-17.052(3)(b)2., F.A.C.

(c) All construction requiring benchmarks shall have a minimum of two (2) existent or established benchmarks for vertical control.

(d) Vertical control for linear type construction sites such as roads and sewer lines shall have a maximum of 1,100' feet between existent or established benchmarks.

(e) Vertical control for acreage construction sites shall have two (2) existent or established benchmarks on the first ten (10) acres plus an additional benchmark for each additional ten (10) acres.

(f) The only required documentation for this type of survey product shall be field notes.

(4) Control Survey:

(a) Geodetic Control Surveys: When applicable, all geodetic control surveys, both vertical and horizontal, shall conform to the Standards and Specifications for Geodetic Control Networks (1984) as set forth by the Federal Geodetic Control Committee (FGCC), which Standards and Specifications are incorporated herein by reference, effective 5-13-96, and the Geospatial Positioning Accuracy Standards Parts 1, 2, and 3, FGDC-STD-007.1-1998, entitled “Geospatial Positioning Accuracy Standards Part 2: Standards for Geodetic Networks”, and FGDC-STD-007.3-1998, entitled “Geospatial Positioning Accuracy Standards Part 3: National Standard for Spatial Data Accuracy”, which are hereby incorporated by reference, effective 5-18-00, copies of which may be obtained via the internet web site (http://fgdc.gov/standards_publications/). No use of the terminology of these standards may be made without completely adopting and following all the standards in their entirety. When these standards are not employed, then a survey, map, or report shall explain applicable standards used in the geodetic control survey. All geodetic control survey maps or reports shall show the horizontal and vertical datum used and shall contain adequate graphical or written descriptions of the locations, construction and marking of all marks used or set and shall explain methods employed in the survey and adjustment.

(b) Other Control Surveys: Any control survey map or report shall detail the datum used and control stations used in a manner consistent with the general survey and map provisions of subsection 5J-17.051, F.A.C.

(5) Descriptions/Sketch to Accompany Description:

(a) Descriptions written by a surveyor and mapper to describe land boundaries by metes and bounds shall provide definitive identification of boundary lines.

(b) When a sketch accompanies the property description, it shall show all information referenced in the description and shall state that such sketch is not a survey. The initial point in the description shall be tied to either a government corner, a recorded corner, or some other well-established survey point.

(6) Digital Data:

(a) When survey information is provided in digital form only, the surveyor and mapper shall provide a signed and sealed report as set forth in sub-subparagraph 5J-17.051(3)(b)14.b., F.A.C.

(b) The digital file will reference the report and that the digital file is not full and complete without the report.

(7) Ortho-Images/Photos:

(a) The survey, map, and/or report must contain a list of control points employed in geo-referencing the image along with the source of control positions used.

(b) Positional Accuracy: Feature accuracies shall be stated.

(c) The Ortho-Image/Photo shall comply with the December 1996 US Department of the Interior, US Geological Survey National Mapping Divisions, “National Mapping Program Technical Instructions Part 2 Specifications Standards for Digital Orthophotos,” which are incorporated herein by reference.

(8) Quantity Survey:

The surveyor and mapper shall obtain horizontal and vertical measurements adequate to delineate graphically geometric configurations and/or dimensions that can be mathematically computed.

(9) Raster Imagery:

(a) The survey and report must contain a list of control points employed in geo-referencing the image along with the source of control positions used. The survey and report must contain a statement clearly stating that “This is not an ortho-image or ortho-photo.”

(b) Feature accuracies shall be stated.

(10) Subdivision Record Plat:

This rule shall not apply to plats being prepared for filing and recording pursuant to Chapter 177, F.S.; however, this rule shall apply to any boundary survey performed during the preparation of the plat.

(11) Specific Purpose Survey:

(a) Surveys which are performed for a purpose other than the purposes encompassed by the definitions in paragraphs 5J-17.050(10)(a)-(i) or (k), F.A.C., shall be permitted only where unusual conditions make impracticable or impossible the performance of one of the types of surveys defined in paragraphs 5J-17.050(10)(a)-(i) or (k), F.A.C.

(b) Such purpose and conditions shall be clearly shown upon the survey map or in the survey report.

(c) Surveys performed for purposes of monumenting, referencing, describing, and mapping centerline or baseline may be performed as Specific Purpose Surveys. Additionally, surveys performed for the purpose of monumenting official right-of-way lines may be performed as Specific Purpose Surveys.

(12) Topographic Survey:

(a) Topographic surveying and mapping by field methods shall meet general provisions applicable to all surveys and maps as set out in Rule 5J-17.051, F.A.C. A minimum of two site benchmarks on or near the survey shall be indicated upon the survey map.

(b) Topographic Features.

1. Intended Features. The surveyor and mapper shall devise a method of reporting which topographic features were intended to be surveyed and mapped, the style of cartographic representation employed for each, and the degree of intended completeness in the surveying and mapping of each feature. As with abbreviations, any symbols, line types, etc. shown on the survey map shall be explained and/or defined in a legend.

2. Obscured Areas. Features in obscured areas where the desired points or surfaces being mapped are not clearly visible on source images shall be clearly labeled on the map as “interpolated” or “estimated” through the use of notes and shall be depicted graphically clearly different from other surveyed features.

3. Scale of Map. The scale of the map that is selected when provided in hard copy shall be sufficient to accurately and clearly show the results of the survey.

4. Property Lines. Any depiction of property lines on a topographic map shall be accompanied with a statement as to the source of the property lines shown.

Rulemaking Authority 472.008, 472.027 FS. Law Implemented 472.027 FS. History–New 9-1-81, Formerly 21HH-6.04, Amended 12-18-88, Formerly 21HH-6.004, Amended 12-25-95, 5-13-96, 5-25-99, 4-4-06, 8-31-06, 8-18-08, Formerly 61G17-6.004, Amended 5-11-15.

5J-17.053 Standards of Practice – Professional Matters in Surveying and Mapping.

In order to safeguard the health, safety and welfare of the public and to maintain integrity and high standards of skill and practice in the surveying and mapping profession, the rules of professional conduct provided in this section shall be binding upon every licensee and on all firms which offer or perform surveying and mapping services in Florida. Licensees shall at all times be cognizant of the public that they serve and shall govern themselves accordingly in the following professional matters:

(1) Fair Dealing in Professional Relationships.

(a) Licensees shall act as faithful agents of their clients in all professional matters.

(b) Licensees, whether or not under oath, shall not be untruthful, deceptive, or misleading, including by omission, in any professional report, oral or written statement, or testimony.

1. A professional report, statement or testimony is false, fraudulent, deceptive or misleading if it: contains a material misrepresentation of fact; omits the statement of any material fact that is necessary to form a complete and accurate understanding of the communication; or is intended or is likely to create an unjustified expectation.

2. Examples of false, fraudulent, deceptive or misleading statements include: a statement that a licensee is a certified specialist in any area outside the licensee’s field of expertise; a statement that the licensee’s education or experience in surveying and mapping is greater than it actually is; a statement that the licensee’s involvement with a surveying and mapping project will be greater than it actually will be.

(c) The licensee shall not make, publish or cause to be made or published, any representation or statement concerning the professional qualifications of the licensee, or those of any partner, associate, firm or organization of the licensee, which is in any way misleading, or which tends to mislead the recipient thereof, or the public, concerning education, experience, specializations or other surveying and mapping qualifications.

(d) A licensee shall not, in the practice of surveying and mapping or in any professional dealings, make, publish, or cause to be made or published, any representation or statement about any competitor or any other licensee which the licensee knows or should know is false and which has or is intended to have the effect of injuring the reputation or business of such other licensee.

(e) A licensee shall not express a professional opinion that is factually insupportable or that is not based on accepted surveying and mapping principles, or that misrepresents data and/or its relative significance in any professional report, oral or written statement, or testimony.

(f) A licensee shall not violate any provisions of state or federal statutes requiring qualifications-based selection of professional surveying and mapping services; shall not knowingly aid or abet any other licensee in violating such statutes; shall not participate in a qualifications-based selection process that the licensee knows is not in compliance with federal or state statutes; and shall not respond to or solicit requests that the licensee knows are in violation of state or federal statutes.

(g) A licensee shall not knowingly permit the publication or use of the licensee’s data, reports, maps, or other professional documents for unlawful purposes.

(h) Licensees may not use their surveying and mapping expertise or their professional surveying and mapping status to commit a crime.

(i) Licensees may not knowingly associate with or permit the use of their names in a business venture with any person or business entity which the licensee knows or should know is engaging in unlawful, fraudulent or dishonest business or professional practices.

(2) Conflicts of Interest: Licensees shall avoid any professional conflicts of interest.

(a) When conflicts cannot be avoided, licensees shall disclose to their employers and clients all known or potential conflicts of interest or other circumstances that could influence or appear to influence their professional judgment or the quality of their professional services provided.

(b) Unless the circumstances are fully disclosed and agreed to in writing by all interested parties, a licensee shall not accept compensation, financial or otherwise, from more than one party for services pertaining to the same project.

(c) Examples of professional conflicts of interest include, but are not limited to:

1. A county employee engaging in the private practice of surveying and mapping on a project over which that person, as a county employee, has approval authority.

2. A licensee soliciting or accepting a professional contract from a governmental body on which that licensee or a principal or officer of his/her business organization serves as a member.

3. A licensee, serving as a member, advisor, or employee of a governmental entity, who participates in its decision to contract for professional services from a private business in which that licensee is a principal or employee.

(d) Licensees may not offer any bribe, commission or gift, either directly or indirectly, to obtain selection or preferment for surveying and mapping employment.

1. An example of prohibited activity under this subsection is a practice known as the “washout” survey, wherein a licensee agrees to accept payment for a surveying and mapping service only upon the contingency of a future event other than the completion of the survey and map.

2. The activity prohibited by this subsection does not pertain to the payment of a fee to a licensed employment agency for securing salaried employment as a surveyor and mapper.

(e) Licensees may not solicit or accept gifts or gratuities directly or indirectly from contractors, their agents or other parties dealing with the licensee’s client or employer in connection with work for which the licensee is responsible.

(3) Confidentiality:

Whether or not a licensee and a client establish requirements of confidentiality contractually, the licensee shall safeguard and preserve the confidences and private information of the client and shall exercise reasonable care to prevent unauthorized disclosure or use thereof by the licensee’s employees and associates, except:

(a) When disclosure is made as a necessary part of performing the services for which the client is employing or engaging the licensee.

(b) When licensee has obtained the consent of the affected client or clients, employer or employers, current or former, but only after full disclosure to them;

(c) When required by law or court order;

(d) When necessary to establish legal proof of licensee’s relationship with such client or employer, current or former, in a court action to recover salaries, fees or other compensation due to the licensee as a result of the licensee’s employment or association with the client or employer, current or former;

(e) When necessary to defend the licensee or the licensee’s employees or associates in a legal action alleging wrongful conduct;

(f) When there is potential danger to the public’s safety and well being and disclosure is reasonably necessary to prevent harm to the public;

(g) When the disclosures were made to the Board regarding other licensees or unlicensed individuals who may have violated laws or rules relating to the practice of surveying and mapping;

(h) When the disclosures relate to illegal conduct.

(4) Use of Another Licensee’s Product.

(a) Work completed by one licensee (original licensee) cannot be adopted or reused by a different licensee (successor licensee), except under the following circumstances:

1. With written consent of the original licensee, or;

2. When the graphics or data depicted on the survey are attributed to the licensee that was in responsible charge of its production, or;

3. When the original licensee’s field notes, supporting documents and/or final product(s) are rightfully in the possession of the successor licensee.

(b) Use of another licensee’s work under any circumstances does not exempt the user from compliance with the survey requirements in Chapter 5J-17, F.A.C.

(5) Retention of Work Products.

(a) For each survey produced, all licensees, except for those who do not have an ownership right to the work product, shall maintain for a minimum of six years from the date of creation at least one copy of all signed and sealed final drawings, plans, specifications, plats, and reports as well as one copy of all related calculations and field notes. These records may be kept in hard copy or electronic or digital format.

(b) Upon the discontinuance of the practice of surveying and mapping, licensees shall ensure the safe storage and reasonable accessibility to clients of all files and file materials for a period of three years in accordance with subparagraph 5J-17.051(2)(b)2., F.A.C. The failure to do so shall constitute cause for discipline.

1. If an individual voluntarily relinquishes his/her professional surveyor and mapper license, the transfer and storage of files is not required.

(6) Signing and Sealing.

(a) Licensees shall sign, date and seal those final drawings, plans, specifications, plats or reports that have been prepared or issued by the licensee and conform to the Standards of Practice for professional surveyors and mappers as outlined in Chapter 5J-17, F.A.C.

(b) Licensees shall not affix their signatures or seals to any final drawings, plans, specifications, plats or reports not prepared under their responsible charge.

(c) Licensees may not affix a signature and seal to any document depicting an area over which the licensee has insufficient knowledge, education, experience, or familiarity.

Rulemaking Authority 472.027 FS. Law Implemented 472.027 FS. History–New 5-11-15.

FLORIDA STATUTES - 472.029 Authorization to enter lands of third parties; conditions.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—Surveyors and mappers or their subordinates may go on, over, and upon the lands of others when necessary to make surveys and maps or locate or set monuments, and, in so doing, may carry with them their agents and employees necessary for that purpose. Entry under the right granted by this subsection does not constitute trespass, and surveyors and mappers and their duly authorized agents or employees so entering are not liable to arrest or to a civil action by reason of such entry; however, this subsection does not give authority to registrants, subordinates, agents, or employees to destroy, injure, damage, or move any physical improvements on lands of another without the written permission of the landowner.